Medical IT Support Athens Georgia

Do you need professional medical IT support?  Tier3MD can help!  We have been servicing practices all over the state of Georgia since 2005.  We only support medical practices and have a very strong focus on HIPAA along with cybersecurity and digital forensics.  We take security very seriously and help your practice get to where it needs to be.

We have a fully staffed helpdesk that is answered live from 7:30am to 5:30pm.  You can easily contact us either by phone, email or through our website.  We have engineers located all over the state of Georgia and support clients as far away as Alask.

If you would like to speak to us about supporting your practice, please contact us at 855-698-4373.

Athens, Georgia

Athens is popular for the University of Georgia, known as the Bulldogs!  It is also one of the top research Colleges in the country. Chartered by the state of Georgia in 1785, the University of Georgia is the birthplace of public higher education in America — launching our nation’s great tradition of world-class public education.

History

In the late 18th century, a trading settlement on the banks of the Oconee River called Cedar Shoals stood where Athens is today. On January 27, 1785, the Georgia General Assembly granted a charter by Abraham Baldwin for the University of Georgia as the first state-supported university. Sixteen years later, in 1801, a committee from the university’s board of trustees selected a site for the university on a hill above Cedar Shoals, in what was then Jackson County. On July 25, John Milledge, one of the trustees and later governor of Georgia, bought 633 acres (256 hectares) from Daniel Easley and donated it to the university. Milledge named the surrounding area Athens after the city that was home to the Platonic Academy of Plato and Aristotle in Greece.[12]

Medical IT Support Athens Georgia

City Hall on College Avenue in Downtown Athens, seen across Washington Street

The first buildings on the University of Georgia campus were made from logs. The town grew as lots adjacent to the college were sold to raise money for the additional construction of the school. By the time the first class graduated from the university in 1804, Athens consisted of three homes, three stores, and a few other buildings facing Front Street, now known as Broad Street. Completed in 1806 and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, Franklin College was the first permanent structure of the University of Georgia and of the city of Athens. This brick building is now known as Old College.

Athens officially became a town in December 1806 with a government made up of a three-member commission. The university and town continued to grow with cotton mills fueling the industrial and commercial development. Athens became known as the “Manchester of the South” after the city in England known for its mills. In 1833 a group of Athens businessmen led by James Camak, tired of their wagons getting stuck in the mud, built one of Georgia’s first railroads, the Georgia, connecting Athens to Augusta by 1841, and to Marthasville (now Atlanta) by 1845. In the 1830s and 1840s, transportation developments and the growing influence of the University of Georgia made Athens one of the state’s most important cities as the antebellum era neared the height of its development. The university essentially created a chain reaction of growth in the community which developed on its doorstep.

During the American Civil War,[15] Athens became a significant supply center when the New Orleans armory was relocated there to what is now called the Chicopee building. Fortifications can still be found along parts of the North Oconee River between College and Oconee Street. In addition, Athens played a small part in the ill-fated Stoneman’s Raid when a skirmish was fought on a site overlooking the Middle Oconee River near what is now the old Macon Highway. A Confederate memorial stands on Broad Street near the University of Georgia Arch.

During Reconstruction, Athens continued to grow. The form of government changed to a mayor-council government with a new city charter on August 24, 1872, and Henry Beusse was elected as the first mayor of Athens.[17] Beusse was instrumental in the city’s rapid growth after the Civil War. After serving as mayor, he worked in the railroad industry and helped bring railroads to the region, creating growth in many of the surrounding communities. Freed slaves moved to the city, where many were attracted by the new centers for education such as the Freedmen’s Bureau. This new population was served by three black newspapers: the Athens Blade, the Athens Clipper, and the Progressive Era.

In the 1880s, as Athens became more densely populated, city services and improvements were undertaken. The Athens Police Department was founded in 1881 and public schools opened in fall of 1886. Telephone service was introduced in 1882 by the Bell Telephone Company. Transportation improvements were also introduced with a street paving program beginning in 1885 and streetcars, pulled by mules, in 1888.

Broad Street in Downtown Athens near North Campus of the University of Georgia

By its centennial in 1901, Athens had experienced a century of development and growth. A new city hall was completed in 1904. An African-American middle class and professional class grew around the corner of Washington and Hull Streets, known as the “Hot Corner”, where the Morton Building was constructed in 1910. The theater at the Morton Building hosted movies and performances by black musicians such as Louis ArmstrongCab Calloway, and Duke Ellington. In 1907 aviation pioneer Ben T. Epps became Georgia’s first pilot on a hill outside town that would become the Athens-Ben Epps Airport.

During World War II, the U.S. Navy built new buildings and paved runways to serve as a training facility for naval pilots. In 1954, the U.S. Navy chose Athens as the site for the Navy Supply Corps school. The school was in Normaltown in the buildings of the old Normal School. It closed in 2011 under the Base Realignment and Closure process. The 56-acre (23-hectare) site is now home to the University of Georgia/Medical College of Georgia Medical Partnership, the University of Georgia College of Public Health, and other health-related programs

In 1961, Athens witnessed part of the civil rights movement when Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes became the first two black students to enter the University of Georgia. Despite the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court ruling in 1954, the Athens–Clarke County school district remained segregated until 1964.